Saturday, January 9, 2016

Apple of my eye......................


Francis Sinatra......................You Are The Sunshine Of My Life



#1 on this list, which appears to have been a labor of love.

So, decide already.................


      In my years as a head coach, I wanted a democratic-style organization with input and communication and freedom of expression, even opinions that were at great variance with my ideas.  But only up to a point.  When it was time for a decision, that decision would be made by me according to the dictates having to do with one thing only, namely, making the team better.
      And once the decision was made, the discussion was over.  My ultimate job, and yours, is not to give an opinion.  Everybody's got an opinion.  Leaders are paid to make a decision.  The difference between offering an opinion and making a decision is the difference between working for the leader and being the leader.

-Bill Walsh with Steve Jamison,  The Score Takes Care Of Itself:  My Philosophy of Leadership

Enables..............................




















“Art enables us to find ourselves and lose ourselves at the same time.” 
-Thomas Merton

Escher's Eye via

On the danger of clinging.........


He who binds to himself a joy
Does the winged life destroy; 
But he who kisses the joy as it flies
Lives in eternity's sun rise.


-William Blake

William Blake circa 1809   pen, ink and watercolor

Fifty years ago.........................


Wilson Pickett.....................................Land Of 1000 Dances

Be really, really, really........


..........................................careful about what you wish for.

My guess this is what would be known as "opening Pandora's Box."  Please don't do it.

On the off chance you are unfamiliar with Pandora's Box, here is the short version.

Highlights................................



































-as captured from this version of Hayek's The Road To Serfdom

You can learn a lot from the comics.....















cartoon via

Wiki on joules is here.

You heard it here first............


...........................................Shale gas is fracking green.

Friday, January 8, 2016

When she dances by...................


Frank Sinatra........................................................Tangerine



A preview from this long-awaited list

A strong stomach....................


     In planning for a successful future, the past can show you how to get there.  Too often we avert our gaze when the past is unpleasant.  We don't want to go there again, even though it contains the road map to a bright future.  How good are you at looking through the evidence from the past - especially the recent past?  There's a certain knack to it, but basically it requires a keen eye for analysis, a commonsense mind for parsing evidence that offers clues to why things went as they did - both good and bad.  And, of course, it often requires a strong stomach, because what you're rummaging through may include not only achievements but the remains of a very painful professional fiasco.

-Bill Walsh with Steve Jamison,  The Score Takes Care Of Itself:  My Philosophy of Leadership

Opening paragraphs................


      Everybody lies.
      Cops lie.  Lawyers lie.  Witnesses lie.  The victims lie.
      A trial is a contest of lies.  And everybody in the courtroom knows this.  The judge knows this.  Even the jury knows this.  They come into the building knowing they will be lied to.  They take their seats in the box and agree to be lied to.
      The trick if you are sitting at the defense table is to be patient.  To wait.  Not for just any lie.  But for the one you can grab on to and forge like hot iron into a sharpened blade.  You then use that blade to rip the case open and spill its guts out on the floor.
      That's my job, to forge the blade.  To sharpen it.  To use it without mercy or conscience.  To be the truth in a place where everybody lies.

-Michael Connelly,  The Brass Verdict

nothing more I want.......................


      But sitting here, under a budding lemon tree, among these lively, lovely people, I am absolutely certain that Tasso's garden is alive with something essentially holy.  I see it in the warm glances exchanged around the fire.  I hear it in Kosma's tender teasing of his father for his habit of depositing olive pits in his shirt pocket.  I feel it all around me.
      I owe much of my appreciation of what is happening here in Tasso's garden to my age.  As an old man, I am at peace with this peacefulness.  There is nothing I want from these people except their companionship.  There is no new excitement or accomplishment I long for.  Indeed at this moment there is nothing more I want from the cosmos than I have right here:  "to see a World" in their faces.

-Daniel Klein, Travels with Epicurus:  A Journey to a Greek Island in Search of a Fulfilled Life

Ed. note:  see the next post to make sense of the "to see a World" quote.

Ed. note #2:  If you have any intention of becoming old, do read this lovely, lively book.

Runs a joy with silken twine............


TO see a world in a grain of sand,
  And a heaven in a wild flower,
Hold infinity in the palm of your hand,
  And eternity in an hour.
A robin redbreast in a cage        5
Puts all heaven in a rage.
A dove-house fill’d with doves and pigeons
Shudders hell thro’ all its regions.
A dog starv’d at his master’s gate
Predicts the ruin of the state.        10
A horse misused upon the road
Calls to heaven for human blood.
Each outcry of the hunted hare
A fibre from the brain does tear.
A skylark wounded in the wing,        15
A cherubim does cease to sing.
The game-cock clipt and arm’d for fight
Does the rising sun affright.
Every wolf’s and lion’s howl
Raises from hell a human soul.        20
The wild deer, wand’ring here and there,
Keeps the human soul from care.
The lamb misus’d breeds public strife,
And yet forgives the butcher’s knife.
The bat that flits at close of eve        25
Has left the brain that won’t believe.
The owl that calls upon the night
Speaks the unbeliever’s fright.
He who shall hurt the little wren
Shall never be belov’d by men.        30
He who the ox to wrath has mov’d
Shall never be by woman lov’d.
The wanton boy that kills the fly
Shall feel the spider’s enmity.
He who torments the chafer’s sprite        35
Weaves a bower in endless night.
The caterpillar on the leaf
Repeats to thee thy mother’s grief.
Kill not the moth nor butterfly,
For the last judgment draweth nigh.        40
He who shall train the horse to war
Shall never pass the polar bar.
The beggar’s dog and widow’s cat,
Feed them and thou wilt grow fat.
The gnat that sings his summer’s song        45
Poison gets from slander’s tongue.
The poison of the snake and newt
Is the sweat of envy’s foot.
The poison of the honey bee
Is the artist’s jealousy.        50
The prince’s robes and beggar’s rags
Are toadstools on the miser’s bags.
A truth that’s told with bad intent
Beats all the lies you can invent.
It is right it should be so;        55
Man was made for joy and woe;
And when this we rightly know,
Thro’ the world we safely go.
Joy and woe are woven fine,
A clothing for the soul divine.        60
Under every grief and pine
Runs a joy with silken twine.
The babe is more than swaddling bands;
Throughout all these human lands
Tools were made, and born were hands,        65
Every farmer understands.
Every tear from every eye
Becomes a babe in eternity;
This is caught by females bright,
And return’d to its own delight.        70
The bleat, the bark, bellow, and roar,
Are waves that beat on heaven’s shore.
The babe that weeps the rod beneath
Writes revenge in realms of death.
The beggar’s rags, fluttering in air,        75
Does to rags the heavens tear.
The soldier, arm’d with sword and gun,
Palsied strikes the summer’s sun.
The poor man’s farthing is worth more
Than all the gold on Afric’s shore.        80
One mite wrung from the lab’rer’s hands
Shall buy and sell the miser’s lands;
Or, if protected from on high,
Does that whole nation sell and buy.
He who mocks the infant’s faith        85
Shall be mock’d in age and death.
He who shall teach the child to doubt
The rotting grave shall ne’er get out.
He who respects the infant’s faith
Triumphs over hell and death.        90
The child’s toys and the old man’s reasons
Are the fruits of the two seasons.
The questioner, who sits so sly,
Shall never know how to reply.
He who replies to words of doubt        95
Doth put the light of knowledge out.
The strongest poison ever known
Came from Caesar’s laurel crown.
Nought can deform the human race
Like to the armour’s iron brace.        100
When gold and gems adorn the plow,
To peaceful arts shall envy bow.
A riddle, or the cricket’s cry,
Is to doubt a fit reply.
The emmet’s inch and eagle’s mile        105
Make lame philosophy to smile.
He who doubts from what he sees
Will ne’er believe, do what you please.
If the sun and moon should doubt,
They’d immediately go out.        110
To be in a passion you good may do,
But no good if a passion is in you.
The whore and gambler, by the state
Licensed, build that nation’s fate.
The harlot’s cry from street to street        115
Shall weave old England’s winding-sheet.
The winner’s shout, the loser’s curse,
Dance before dead England’s hearse.
Every night and every morn
Some to misery are born,        120
Every morn and every night
Some are born to sweet delight.
Some are born to sweet delight,
Some are born to endless night.
We are led to believe a lie        125
When we see not thro’ the eye,
Which was born in a night to perish in a night,
When the soul slept in beams of light.
God appears, and God is light,
To those poor souls who dwell in night;        130
But does a human form display
To those who dwell in realms of day.

"Auguries of Innocence"
circa 1803
























Blake's painting via

Fifty years ago.....................


The Troggs...........................................................Wild Thing

Beauty..............................



About precision.........................


One problem with philosophical thinking - as with most academic disciplines - is that it tends to stick ideas into absolute categories, leaving little wiggle room for the complexities and inherent internal contradictions of ordinary human experience.  One of Aristotle's lasting contributions to philosophy and science was his counsel, "We must not expect more precision that the subject matter admits."  And the question, "What is the best way to be an old man?" is far from being a precise one.  In fact it's about as open-ended as they get.

-Daniel Klein,  Travels with Epicurus:  A Journey to a Greek Island in Search of a Fulfilled Life

HIghlights...............................



















































-as extracted from this version of Voltaire's Candide and Philosophical Letters

Well, good..............................


The lowest oil prices since 2009 translated into a $115 billion windfall for consumers last year, according to the American Automobile Association — about $550 per driver. Analysts say four-fifths of that cash got spent ...
-as culled from this The American Interest post

Thursday, January 7, 2016

Shine the darkness from my eyes.....


Jesse Colin Young..............................................Mornin' Sun

Highlights...........................................








































-as captured from Bill Walsh's and Steve Jamison's book,  The Score Takes Care of Itself:  My Philosophy of Leadership

Churnings..............................


      For all his negativity about old folk, Aristotle did say that "education is the best provision for the journey to old age," and part of what he meant is that acquiring good tools for thinking - and thinking philosophically - prepares us for one of the principal callings of an authentic old age:  pondering the big questions.
      I need to take a step back when considering such questions.  Sometimes I think my basic philosophical impulses, those "what's it all about?" churnings in my gut, were ruined by studying academic philosophy.  Too often I became preoccupied with the heady, abstruse concepts of the great thinkers and lost that sense of wonder that made me read them in the first place.  I need to remind myself that to head off in the direction of philosophy, a person really only needs the basic intuition that the unexamined life doesn't quite cut it for him.

-Daniel Klein,  Travels with Epicurus:  A Journey to a Greek Island in Search of a Fulfilled Life

Every day..............................


No, no, there is no going back.
Less and less you are
that possibility you were.
More and more you have become
those lives and deaths
that have belonged to you.
You have become a sort of grave
containing much that was
and is no more in time, beloved
then, now, and always.
And so you have become a sort of tree
standing over the grave.
Now more than ever you can be
generous toward each day
that comes, young, to disappear
forever, and yet remain
unaging in the mind.
Every day you have less reason
not to give yourself away.

-Wendell Berry,  1993

Fifty years ago.................


Shades of Blue....................................................Oh How Happy

Lemonade..........................................


"Creating gold from dross is alchemy;  making lemonade when you're give lemons is leadership;  making lemonade when you don't have any lemons is great leadership."
-Bill Walsh

Flat tax anyone..............


Megan McArdle riffs on tax "expenditures":

Paying for new spending by “closing the loopholes” is a favorite rallying cry of almost everyone. But rarely are those people picturing giving up their own deductions for mortgage interest, employer-sponsored health insurance, dependent children, or retirement accounts. Why, no! Those aren't loopholes. Those are just the basics of a decent middle-class life. Loopholes are the deductions used by other, richer people who can afford crooked lawyers.

Full post is here.

Speaking of taxes................


Barry Ritholtz points to a Christmas present from Washington.

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

A slight misjudgment.......


Poco...................................................................Glory Bound




Come on all you brothers, come on one and all
Come on get together, it's time to meet the call
You'll see lots of banners, down at City Hall
Lots of pretty girls to make a man feel six foot tall

You can bring your napsack, bring your carbine too
It ain't gonna take too long, 'cause there ain't much to do
Hey, we've just got to show those Yanks, we mean what we say
They can't tell us what to do, we'll chase them all away

Oh, catch the train a' runnin', runnin' right through town
Headed straight for glory - glorybound
Catch the train a' runnin', runnin' right through town glorybound

We're all gonna meet them, out at Cutter's Ridge
Right there in the clearing, just beyond the bridge
You'll see all the ladies with their parasols
Cheering for their favorites, they'll be waving to us all

Oh, catch the train a' runnin', runnin' right through town
Headed straight for glory - glorybound
You better catch the train a'runnin', runnin' right through town


On fathoming the unfathomable.......


      I have this nagging suspicion that for the past fifty-odd years I have been dismissing Heidegger's question as total twaddle without ever really trying it on for size.  Martin Heidegger was a twentieth-century German existentialist who focused - if hundreds of pages of dense, enigmatic prose can be called a focus - on the concept of being.  As much as I can grasp his question, I gather that he is not asking why some things exist and others do not, or even asking what is is that causes something to exist and what constitutes its existence.  No, he is after even bigger game than that.  Heidegger is asking us to confront the idea that existence itself can be called into question, and this, he believes, is the ultimate philosophical question.  He writes, "To philosophize is to ask 'Why are there things that are rather than nothing?'  Really to ask this question signifies: a daring attempt to fathom this unfathomable question by disclosing what it summons us to ask, to push our questioning to the very end.  Where such an attempt occurs there is philosophy."

-Daniel Klein, as excerpted from Travels with Epicurus:  A Journey to a Greek Island in Search of a Fulfilled Life

Ed. note:  Heidegger's quote and question come from his Introduction to Metaphysics, where in he also apparently says,  "It is absolutely correct and proper to say that `You can't do anything with philosophy.' ... For the rejoinder imposes itself: granted that WE cannot do anything with philosophy, might not philosophy, if we concern ourselves with it, do something WITH US?" 

eased his heavy breathing........


All out of doors looked darkly in at him
Through the thin frost, almost in separate stars,
That gathers on the pane in empty rooms.
What kept his eyes from giving back the gaze
Was the lamp tilted near them in his hand.
What kept him from remembering what it was
That brought him to that creaking room was age.
He stood with barrels round him -- at a loss.
And having scared the cellar under him
In clomping there, he scared it once again
In clomping off; -- and scared the outer night,
Which has its sounds, familiar, like the roar
Of trees and crack of branches, common things,
But nothing so like beating on a box.
A light he was to no one but himself
Where now he sat, concerned with he knew what,
A quiet light, and then not even that.
He consigned to the moon, such as she was,
So late-arising, to the broken moon
As better than the sun in any case
For such a charge, his snow upon the roof,
His icicles along the wall to keep;
And slept. The log that shifted with a jolt
Once in the stove, disturbed him and he shifted,
And eased his heavy breathing, but still slept.
One aged man -- one man -- can't keep a house,
A farm, a countryside, or if he can,
It's thus he does it of a winter night. 


-Robert Frost
"An Old Man's Winter Night"  1916

Great moments in opening sentences....


Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether this station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show.

-Charles Dickens,  David Copperfield

additional "great moments" may be found here

Fifty years ago..................


(with perhaps the finest example ever of disinterested lip-syncing)

The Standells.............................................................Dirty Water

Leisure.......................


It will be said that, while a little leisure is pleasant, men would not know how to fill their days if they had only four hours of work out of the twenty-four. In so far as this is true in the modern world, it is a condemnation of our civilization; it would not have been true at any earlier period. There was formerly a capacity for light-heartedness and play which has been to some extent inhibited by the cult of efficiency. The modern man thinks that everything ought to be done for the sake of something else, and never for its own sake.

-Bertrand Russell, as extracted from his 1932 essay "In Praise of Idleness"

Finding something beautiful............


My Sweetie cashes in her Giant Eagle reward points....



dancing in the eddies..................





































“We are travellers on a cosmic journey, stardust, swirling and dancing in the eddies and whirlpools of infinity. Life is eternal. We have stopped for a moment to encounter each other, to meet, to love, to share. This is a precious moment. It is a little parenthesis in eternity.” 
-Paulo Coelho

photo via

Ed. note:  The above quote, found here,  has also been attributed to Deepak Chopra.  Time was not taken to sort it all out.  If you are inclined to investigate, do let me know.

All in good time...............


Cold weather returns...............................It is winter you know.

Pond surface at OSUN/COTC starting to ice over




















Oh good, another polar vortex.  This should sell some winter coats





























AccuWeather report from here

Tuesday, January 5, 2016

Spirits open to the thrust of grace......


Barenaked Ladies........................Lovers In A Dangerous Time



lyrics here

Responsibility......................


“Man is condemned to be free;  because once thrown into the world,  he is responsible for everything he does.   It is up to you to give life a meaning.”

A finish worthy of the start............


WHY should not old men be mad?
Some have known a likely lad
That had a sound fly-fisher's wrist
Turn to a drunken journalist;
A girl that knew all Dante once
Live to bear children to a dunce;
A Helen of social welfare dream,
Climb on a wagonette to scream.
Some think it a matter of course that chance
Should starve good men and bad advance,
That if their neighbours figured plain,
As though upon a lighted screen,
No single story would they find
Of an unbroken happy mind,
A finish worthy of the start.
Young men know nothing of this sort,
Observant old men know it well;
And when they know what old books tell
And that no better can be had,
Know why an old man should be mad. 


-William Butler Yeats
"Why Should Not Old Men Be Mad", 1936

Thoughts.........................


.............................random or otherwise.  Another collection from Michael Wade.  We are all waiting patiently for his book.  Some snippets:

~ It will be a great person who produces as much pleasure as coffee and chocolate. ~ Complexity and simplicity are multi-talented and can play heroes and villains. ~ Excuse-making is a major industry in every nation. ~  Each day is a search for time even if we are surrounded by it.

Fifty years ago.................


The Mindbenders...................................Groovy Kind of Love



better audio from the studio version here

HIghlights.........................................





































Bill Walsh, with Steve Jamison and Craig Walsh,   The Score Takes Care Of Itself:  My Philosophy of Leadership

Work is easy...........................


...the eighteenth century German philosopher Johann Hamann, who believed that the idle have a better perspective on philosophical ideas than academics do, in part because they are less likely to get caught up in minutiae.  He would get no argument from me on that.  Apparently, Hamann could get a tad defensive on the subject of idleness:  when a friend criticized him for loafing, he is said to have retorted that work is easy, but true idleness takes courage and fortitude.

-Daniel Klein,  Travels with Epicurus:  A Journey to a Greek Island in Search of a Fulfilled Life

Heroic spirit indeed..................


"A thirsty ambition for truth and virtue, and a frenzy to conquer all lies and vices which are not recognized as such nor desire to be; herein consists the heroic spirit of the philosopher."
-Johann Georg Hamann

Monday, January 4, 2016

The very best kind...............................


Mannheim Steamroller....................................Chocolate Fudge

So, this will be problematic..............


.....An attempt to improve our language, one conversation at a time.

via

Feeding time.........................


.............................................................................Your choice.

Trying................................


.............................................................more and less.

Fifty years ago.............................


The Rolling Stones.........................................Paint It Black

Bloggery...............................


...........................................at its finest.    Our boy is on a roll.


Highlights......................................




From:  Bill Walsh, with Steve Jamison and Craig Walsh,  The Score Takes Care of Itself:  My Philosophy of Leadership.


Editor's Note:  For a while there, one of my favorite stops along the Intertunnel way was The Highlights of My Day.  Perhaps I liked it because I too read with a yellow highlighter in hand.  The site has gone quiet.  Hopefully it will return.  In the meantime..............